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Butcher's Broom Health Benefits, Properties, and Uses

Butcher's Broom

Scientific Name: Ruscus aculeatus

Common Names: Box Holly

Properties: Anti-fungal, Antibacterial, Diuretic, Anti-inflammatory, Laxative, Mild laxative

What is Butcher's Broom?

Butcher’s broom is a small evergreen plant that grows in areas of northwestern Europe and the Mediterranean region. It’s similar to asparagus. Butcher’s broom can be harvested to be used as an herbal remedy by using the roots and young stems in various herbal medicines. It’s often paired with rosemary as an herbal remedy since they are both believed to help stimulate the circulatory system.1, 2

Butcher's Broom Uses and Health Benefits

Among butcher’s broom uses, it has been used as a laxative and diuretic as far back as the first century. In the 17th century, it was used as a remedy for bone fractures to help them heal when taken orally.

Butcher’s broom benefits the body’s vascular system by tightening and strengthening veins through its vasoconstrictor and anti-inflammatory properties.3 That makes it an effective treatment for hemorrhoids because it keeps your veins from expanding during a bowel movement. Butcher’s broom has also been proven to be an effective treatment for chronic venous insufficiency.1

Though a butcher’s broom diet isn’t as common as it was in folk medicine, the herb is still used for conditions like:

  • Deep Vein Thrombosis - Deep vein thrombosis is a condition characterized by a blood clot in a deep part of the body. It typically affects veins in the legs. Butcher’s broom is said to help remedy deep vein thrombosis when taken orally.
  • Varicose Veins - Varicose veins occur when pressure on the valves in your veins causes the valves to stop working properly. This results in enlarged, visible, and twisted veins that can oftentimes results in pain. Butcher’s broom benefits varicose vein patients by reducing swelling in the veins. 
  • Lymphedema - Lymphedema refers to fluid build-up in the body, which can cause swollen arms and legs. Butcher’s broom’s anti-inflammatory properties may help reduce this swelling when taken orally.

Butcher's Broom Side Effects and Precautions

Though butcher’s broom has long been used in folk medicine, little scientific research has been done on the herb, so it is important to proceed with caution when using a butcher’s broom remedy. Butcher’s broom may interact with other medications and herbs, such as over-the-counter allergy and decongestant medications as well as some blood pressure medications.5 Do not use butcher’s broom to treat serious health conditions without first talking to your doctor. Discuss what medications and herbs you’re taking with your care provider to ensure a butcher’s broom diet won’t interact with them.

 

References

  1. http://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hn-2058001
  2. http://www.herbs2000.com/herbs/herbs_butchers_broom.htm
  3. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/06/16/how-do-you-know-if-you-have-hemorrhoids-or-something-serious.aspx
  4. http://umm.edu/health/medical/ency/articles/deep-venous-thrombosis
  5. http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/condition/varicose-veins
  6. http://umm.edu/health/medical/ency/carepoints/lymphedema

CuresDecoded worldwide community recommends Butcher's Broom for:

Gangrene Effective
Varicose Vein Effective
Lymphedema Effective
Syphilis Effective
Breast Cancer Effective
Cancer Effective

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